2019 Q3 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and other employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the third quarter of 2019. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

July 31

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the second quarter of 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. (See the exception below, under “August 12.”)
  • File a 2018 calendar-year retirement plan report (Form 5500 or Form 5500-EZ) or request an extension.

August 12

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the second quarter of 2019 (Form 941), if you deposited on time and in full all of the associated taxes due.

September 16

  • If a calendar-year C corporation, pay the third installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.
  • If a calendar-year S corporation or partnership that filed an automatic six-month extension:
    • File a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120S, Form 1065 or Form 1065-B) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due.
    • Make contributions for 2018 to certain employer-sponsored retirement plans.

© 2019

Hiring this summer? You may qualify for a valuable tax credit

Is your business hiring this summer? If the employees come from certain “targeted groups,” you may be eligible for the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This includes youth whom you bring in this summer for two or three months. The maximum credit employers can claim is $2,400 to $9,600 for each eligible employee.

10 targeted groups

An employer is generally eligible for the credit only for qualified wages paid to members of 10 targeted groups:

  • Qualified members of families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program,
  • Qualified veterans,
  • Designated community residents who live in Empowerment Zones or rural renewal counties,
  • Qualified ex-felons,
  • Vocational rehabilitation referrals,
  • Qualified summer youth employees,
  • Qualified members of families in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program,
  • Qualified Supplemental Security Income recipients,
  • Long-term family assistance recipients, and
  • Qualified individuals who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer.

For each employee, there’s also a minimum requirement that the employee have completed at least 120 hours of service for the employer, and that employment begin before January 1, 2020.

Also, the credit isn’t available for certain employees who are related to the employer or work more than 50% of the time outside of a trade or business of the employer (for example, working as a house cleaner in the employer’s home). And it generally isn’t available for employees who have previously worked for the employer.

Calculate the savings

For employees other than summer youth employees, the credit amount is calculated under the following rules. The employer can take into account up to $6,000 of first-year wages per employee ($10,000 for “long-term family assistance recipients” and/or $12,000, $14,000 or $24,000 for certain veterans). If the employee completed at least 120 hours but less than 400 hours of service for the employer, the wages taken into account are multiplied by 25%. If the employee completed 400 or more hours, all of the wages taken into account are multiplied by 40%.

Therefore, the maximum credit available for the first-year wages is $2,400 ($6,000 × 40%) per employee. It is $4,000 [$10,000 × 40%] for “long-term family assistance recipients”; $4,800, $5,600 or $9,600 [$12,000, $14,000 or $24,000 × 40%] for certain veterans. In order to claim a $9,600 credit, a veteran must be certified as being entitled to compensation for a service-connected disability and be unemployed for at least six months during the one-year period ending on the hiring date.

Additionally, for “long-term family assistance recipients,” there’s a 50% credit for up to $10,000 of second-year wages, resulting in a total maximum credit, over two years, of $9,000 [$10,000 × 40% plus $10,000 × 50%].

The “first year” described above is the year-long period which begins with the employee’s first day of work. The “second year” is the year that immediately follows.

For summer youth employees, the rules described above apply, except that you can only take into account up to $3,000 of wages, and the wages must be paid for services performed during any 90-day period between May 1 and September 15. That means that, for summer youth employees, the maximum credit available is $1,200 ($3,000 × 40%) per employee. Summer youth employees are defined as those who are at least 16 years old, but under 18 on the hiring date or May 1 (whichever is later), and reside in an Empowerment Zone, enterprise community or renewal community.

We can help

The WOTC can offset the cost of hiring qualified new employees. There are some additional rules that, in limited circumstances, prohibit the credit or require an allocation of the credit. And you must fill out and submit paperwork to the government. Contact us for assistance or more information about your situation.

© 2019

Lean manufacturers: Reap the benefits of lean accounting

Standard cost accounting doesn’t necessarily work for lean operations. Instead, lean accounting offers a simplified reporting alternative that generates more timely, relevant financial data. But it’s not right for every situation.

What’s lean manufacturing?

Lean manufacturers strive for continuous improvement and elimination of non-value-added activities. Rather than scheduling workflow from one functional department to another, these manufacturers organize their facilities into cross-functional work groups or cells.

Lean manufacturing is a “pull-demand” system, where customer orders jumpstart the production process. Lean companies view inventory not as an asset but as a waste of cash flow and storage space.

Why won’t traditional accounting methods work?

From a benchmarking standpoint, liquidity and profitability ratios tend to decline when traditional cost accounting methods are applied to newly improved operations. For example, to minimize inventory, companies transitioning from mass production to lean production must initially deplete in-stock inventories before producing more units. They also must write off obsolete items. As they implement lean principles, many companies learn that their inventories were overvalued due to obsolete items and inaccurate overhead allocation rates (traditionally based on direct labor hours).

During the transition phase, several costs — such as deferred compensation and overhead expense — transition from the balance sheet to the income statement. Accordingly, lean manufacturers may initially report higher costs and, therefore, reduced profits on their income statements. In addition, their balance sheets initially show lower inventory.

Alone, these financial statement trends will likely raise a red flag among investors and lenders — and possibly lead to erroneous business decisions.

How does lean accounting work?

Standard cost accounting is time consuming and transaction-driven. To estimate cost of goods sold, standard cost accounting uses complex variance accounts, such as purchase price variances, labor efficiency variances and overhead spending variances.

In contrast, lean accounting is relatively simple and flexible. Rather than lumping costs into overhead, lean accounting methods trace costs directly to the manufacturer’s cost of goods sold, typically dividing them into four value stream categories:

  1. Materials costs,
  2. Procurement costs,
  3. Conversion costs, such as factory wages and benefits, equipment depreciation and repairs, supplies, and scrap, and
  4. Occupancy costs.

These are easier to understand and evaluate than the variances used in standard cost accounting. In addition, box score reports are often used in lean accounting to supplement profit and loss statements. These reports list performance measures that traditional financial statements neglect, such as scrap rates, inventory turns, on-time delivery rates, customer satisfaction scores and sales per employee.

Should your company abandon standard cost accounting?

Most companies are required to use standard cost accounting methods for formal reporting purposes to comply with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). But lean manufacturers may benefit from comparing traditional and lean financial statements. Such comparisons may even highlight areas to target with future lean improvement initiatives. Contact us for more information.

© 2019

Deducting business meal expenses under today’s tax rules

In the course of operating your business, you probably spend time and money “wining and dining” current or potential customers, vendors and employees. What can you deduct on your tax return for these expenses? The rules changed under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), but you can still claim some valuable write-offs.

No more entertainment deductions

One of the biggest changes is that you can no longer deduct most business-related entertainment expenses. Beginning in 2018, the TCJA disallows deductions for entertainment expenses, including those for sports events, theater productions, golf outings and fishing trips.

Meal deductions still allowed

You can still deduct 50% of the cost of food and beverages for meals conducted with business associates. However, you need to follow three basic rules in order to prove that your expenses are business related:

  1. The expenses must be “ordinary and necessary” in carrying on your business. This means your food and beverage costs are customary and appropriate. They shouldn’t be lavish or extravagant.
  2. The expenses must be directly related or associated with your business. This means that you expect to receive a concrete business benefit from them. The principal purpose for the meal must be business. You can’t go out with a group of friends for the evening, discuss business with one of them for a few minutes, and then write off the check.
  3. You must be able to substantiate the expenses. There are requirements for proving that meal and beverage expenses qualify for a deduction. You must be able to establish the amount spent, the date and place where the meals took place, the business purpose and the business relationship of the people involved.

Set up detailed recordkeeping procedures to keep track of business meal costs. That way, you can prove them and the business connection in the event of an IRS audit.

Other considerations

What if you spend money on food and beverages at an entertainment event? The IRS clarified in guidance (Notice 2018-76) that taxpayers can still deduct 50% of food and drink expenses incurred at entertainment events, but only if business was conducted during the event or shortly before or after. The food-and-drink expenses should also be “stated separately from the cost of the entertainment on one or more bills, invoices or receipts,” according to the guidance.

Another related tax law change involves meals provided to employees on the business premises. Before the TCJA, these meals provided to an employee for the convenience of the employer were 100% deductible by the employer. Beginning in 2018, meals provided for the convenience of an employer in an on-premises cafeteria or elsewhere on the business property are only 50% deductible. After 2025, these meals won’t be deductible at all.

Plan ahead

As you can see, the treatment of meal and entertainment expenses became more complicated after the TCJA. Your tax advisor can keep you up to speed on the issues and suggest strategies to get the biggest tax-saving bang for your business meal bucks.

© 2019

Now or later? When to report subsequent events

Financial statements present a company’s financial position as of a specific date, typically the end of the year or quarter. But sometimes events happen shortly after the end of the period that have financial implications for the prior period or for the future. Here’s a look at what’s reportable and what’s not.

Classifying subsequent events

So-called “subsequent events” happen between the date of the financial statements and the date the financial statements are available to be issued. This lag usually lasts two or three months, because it takes time to record end-of-period journal entries, make estimates, draft footnotes and, if applicable, complete external compilation, review or audit procedures. The two types of subsequent events include:

Recognized. These events provide further evidence of conditions that existed on the financial statement date. For example, a major customer might file for bankruptcy. There was probably evidence of the customer’s financial distress in the prior period, such as a decrease in revenue or a buildup of receivables. The customer’s bankruptcy filing may trigger a write-off for bad debts to be recorded on the balance sheet in the prior period.

Nonrecognized. These subsequent events reflect unforeseeable conditions that didn’t exist at the end of the accounting period. Examples might include a change in foreign exchange rates, a fire or an unexpected natural disaster that severely damages the business.

Generally, the former must be recorded in the financial statements. The latter type of subsequent event isn’t required to be recorded but may have to be disclosed in the footnotes.

Disclosing subsequent events

Nonrecognized subsequent events must be disclosed in the footnotes only if failure to disclose the details would cause the financial statements to be misleading to investors and lenders. Subsequent event disclosures should include 1) a description of the nature of the event, and 2) an estimate of the financial effect (or, if not practical, a statement that an estimate can’t be made).

In some extreme cases, the effect of a subsequent event may be so pervasive that a company’s viability is questionable. This may cause the CPA to re-evaluate the going concern assumption that underlies its financial statements.

Footnotes add value

Subsequent events may not be reflected on a company’s balance sheet or income statement. But, when in doubt, companies typically disclose subsequent events to promote transparency in financial reporting. Contact us for more information about reporting and disclosing subsequent events.

© 2019

2019 Q2 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and other employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines that apply to businesses and other employers during the second quarter of 2019. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

April 1

  • File with the IRS if you’re an employer that will electronically file 2018 Form 1097, Form 1098, Form 1099 (other than those with an earlier deadline) and/or Form W-2G.
  • If your employees receive tips and you file electronically, file Form 8027.
  • If you’re an Applicable Large Employer and filing electronically, file Forms 1094-C and 1095-C with the IRS. For all other providers of minimum essential coverage filing electronically, file Forms 1094-B and 1095-B with the IRS.

April 15

  • If you’re a calendar-year corporation, file a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120) or file for an automatic six-month extension (Form 7004) and pay any tax due.
  • Corporations pay the first installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.

April 30

  • Employers report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the first quarter of 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due.

May 10

  • Employers report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the first quarter of 2019 (Form 941), if you deposited on time and fully paid all of the associated taxes due.

June 17

  • Corporations pay the second installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.

© 2019

Changes in qualified transportation fringe benefits for parking

by Nicole Oeltjen

Tax Senior at Atchley & Associates, LLP

Per the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act signed into law in 2017, tax-exempt organizations that provide their employees with qualified transportation fringe benefits, which includes on-sight parking – are now subject to unrelated business tax. The IRS issued further guidance on the new parking and transportation tax in late December 2018, which applies to expenses paid or incurred after December 31, 2017. Organizations are still allowed to subsidize commuting and parking expenses through a bona fide reimbursement arrangement, pre-taxed qualified “cafeteria” plans, or compensation reduction agreements so that the employee can exclude the amount on their W2. An employer may provide qualified transportation benefits-including parking-to each employee at a value of $265 a month (2019) and the benefit is exempt from employee wages and payroll tax. However, any amount provided to the employee will now be reported on a 990-T and is considered unrelated business income and taxed at a corporate rate of 21%. There are additional rules regarding payroll that are not covered in this discussion.

Per the updates to IRC Section 274(l)(1), ” No deduction shall be allowed under this chapter for any expense incurred for providing any transportation, or any payment or reimbursement, to an employee of the taxpayer in connection with travel between the employee’s residence and place of employment, except as necessary for ensuring the safety of the employee.” This means, that since the organization can no longer deduct the costs allocated to employee parking, the costs will now be considered unrelated business income, unless the organization does not have any employee reserved parking spots AND more than 50% of the available parking spots are primarily used by the general public. This applies to organizations that either own their own parking lot, rent a building that has parking, or pays for parking for their employees offsite.

 

Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefits

  • Transit passes (passes, tokens, fare cards, vouchers, etc.) for mass transit such as by bus, train, monorail, subway, ferry, streetcars, tramcars, etc.
  • Vanpooling via a commuter highway vehicle equipped to carry at least six passengers in addition to the driver
  • Bicycle expenses such as for the purchase, improvement, repair or storage of a bicycle used for commuting
  • Parking facilities (garages, lots, etc.) on or near the employer’s business premises, or on or near a location from which an employee commutes to work (“park and ride”)

 

Costs associated with parking that are no longer deductible if provided to employees, and are now taxable per IRS Notice 2018-99:

− Rent or lease payments, or portions of rent or lease payments (if not broken out separately)

− Repairs and maintenance                      − Trash removal; cleaning

− Utilities                                                       − Landscape costs

− Insurance                                                  − Parking lot attendant expenses

− Property taxes                                           − Security

− Interest                                                       − Other

− Snow/ice/leaf removal

 

Costs that will remain deductible, and are not taxable per IRS Notice 2018-99.

− Depreciation, if the parking facility is owned by the employer

− Expenses for items not located on or in the parking facility, including items related to property next to the parking facility, such as landscaping or lighting

 

Initial questions to determine whether the organization is subject to tax

  • Does the organization have a parking lot, or lease a parking lot, that provides employee parking during the organization’s business hours?
  • Does the organization have reserved spots designated to employees or board members stated with a sign or marked by a barrier to entry?
  • Of the parking spots available at the organization’s office location, are the majority of the parking spots used by the organization’s employees? Majority is >50%
  • Is the organization providing employees with bus fare, paying for parking, or providing other transportation benefits?

 

Determine the amount of unrelated business income

Step 1: Calculate the disallowed expense for reserved employee parking spots:

  • Identify the number of spots in the parking facility that are exclusively reserved for the organization’s employees. Reserved is defined by, but not limited to, specific signage, separate facility, portion of the facility segregated by a barrier to entry or limited by terms of access.
  • Determine the percentage of reserved employee spots in relation to the total parking spots
  • Multiply the percentage by the organization’s total parking expenses. This amount is the total parking expenses that is a disallowed expense under the new tax law and is considered unrelated business income.

Step 2: Determine the primary use of remaining spots using the primary use test:

  • Identify the remaining parking spots in the parking facility and determine whether they are used primarily by employees or the general public. Primary use means greater than 50% of actual or estimated usage of the parking spots in the parking facility. This is tested during normal hours of the organization’s activities on a typical day. Non-reserved parking spots that are available to the general public but are empty during normal hours of operation are treated as general public spots.
  • General public is defined, but not limited to, customers, visitors, individuals delivering goods or services to the organization, patients of a health care facility, students of an educational institution and congregants of a religious organization.
  • Signage is not required to qualify for general use parking in the primary use test.
  • The organization can aggregate parking lots in multiple locations if all in the same city.

Step 3: Calculate the disallowed expenses for reserved nonemployee parking spots:

  • Determine if the organization has reserved for nonemployee parking spots. An example would be if there was signage indicating “customer parking only.” If yes, then the allocated expenses are deductible as a business expense, not subject to UBIT.

Step 4: Determine employee use of the remaining parking spots:

  • Specifically identify the number of employee spots based on actual or estimated usage. Actual or estimated usage may be based on:
    • number of spots
    • number of employees
    • the hours of use
    • or other measures.

 

Notes:

  • Organizations have until March 31st, 2019 to change signage and access in their parking facilities to eliminate reserved employee parking. Such parking spots can be treated as unreserved retroactively to January 1, 2018.
  • If the costs allocated to employee parking is less than $1,000 for the year, and the organization does not have any other unrelated business income, then the organization is under the filing requirement to report unrelated business income on Form 990-T.
  • At this time, accountants are taking the costs of the parking lot as the value for UBIT. No other guidance has been given to determine value if the organization does not have parking costs.
  • For fiscal year organizations, the qualified transportation benefits paid or incurred before January 1, 2018 are still deductible to the organization, and are not considered in the calculation for unrelated business income.

The home office deduction: Actual expenses vs. the simplified method

If you run your business from your home or perform certain functions at home that are related to your business, you might be able to claim a home office deduction against your business income on your 2018 income tax return. There are now two methods for claiming this deduction: the actual expenses method and the simplified method.

Basics of the deduction

In general, you’ll qualify for a home office deduction if part of your home is used “regularly and exclusively” as your principal place of business.

If your home isn’t your principal place of business, you may still be able to deduct home office expenses if 1) you physically meet with patients, clients or customers on your premises, or 2) you use a storage area in your home (or a separate free-standing structure, such as a garage) exclusively and regularly for your business.

Actual expenses

Traditionally, taxpayers have deducted actual expenses when they claim a home office deduction. Deductible home office expenses may include:

  • Direct expenses, such as the cost of painting and carpeting a room used exclusively for business,
  • A proportionate share of indirect expenses, such as mortgage interest, property taxes, utilities, repairs and insurance, and
  • A depreciation allowance.

But keeping track of actual expenses can be time consuming.

The simplified method

Fortunately, there’s a simplified method that’s been available since 2013: You can deduct $5 for each square foot of home office space, up to a maximum total of $1,500.

For example, if you’ve converted a 300-square-foot bedroom to an office you use exclusively and regularly for business, you can write off $1,500 under the simplified method (300 square feet x $5). However, if your business is located in a 600-square-foot finished basement, the deduction will still be only $1,500 because of the cap on the deduction under this method.

As you can see, the cap can make the simplified method less beneficial for larger home office spaces. But even for spaces of 300 square feet or less, taxpayers may qualify for a bigger deduction using the actual expense method. So, tracking your actual expenses can be worth the extra hassle.

Flexibility in filing

When claiming the home office deduction, you’re not locked into a particular method. For instance, you might choose the actual expense method on your 2018 return, use the simplified method when you file your 2019 return next year and then switch back to the actual expense method thereafter. The choice is yours.

Unsure whether you qualify for the home office deduction? Or wondering whether you should deduct actual expenses or use the simplified method? Contact us. We can help you determine what’s right for your specific situation.

© 2019

What is and isn’t a financial statement audit?

by Tyler Mosley, CPA

Audit Partner at Atchley & Associates, LLP

 

In the public accounting world, we sometimes assume everyone knows what a financial statement audit is and what it isn’t. However, that is a misconception as the term “audit” can be used to describe a variety of compliance related activities.  For example, an income tax audit performed by the IRS is completely different than a financial statement audit performed by an independent auditor. So…what is a financial statement audit?

A financial statement audit is an examination of an organization’s financial statements by an independent auditor who must be a certified public accountant (CPA).  The examination is performed in accordance with Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) and a reporting framework chosen by the party who authorizes the audit engagement.  In most cases, the framework chosen is Generally Accepted Accounting Standards (GAAP) as that is what most third parties who request a financial statement audit require.  However, a financial statement audit can be performed using a variety of reporting frameworks, such as but not limited to income tax basis, modified cash basis, cash basis, or statutory basis.

The independent auditors’ role in the engagement is to provide an opinion on whether or not the financial statements presented are materially correct in all respects related to the reporting framework chosen.  An audit involves the independent auditors obtaining an understanding of your organization’s internal control, assessing fraud risk, substantively testing accounting records through inspection, observation, and third-party confirmation or corroborative inquiry.

Now that we have defined what a financial statement audit is, let’s discuss what it isn’t.  A financial statement audit does not serve the same purpose as a financial statement compilation or review.

A financial statement review provides a conclusion as to whether they believe any material modifications should be made to the presented financial statements based on the reporting framework that has been chosen.  In a review engagement, the CPA is required to understand the industry in which the organization operates including accounting principles that are unique to the industry.  The CPA will also ask questions about your financial activity and perform analytical procedures to identify areas in the financial statements where material misstatements are likely to arise.  The CPA does not obtain an understanding of your organization’s internal controls, assess fraud risk, or substantively test accounting records.  As such, the CPA only provides limited assurance on the financial statements.

A financial statement compilation is a service that does not have to be performed by a CPA or even an independent third party. However, if the person preparing the compilation is not independent they must disclose the fact in the compilation.  The CPA does not provide an opinion on if the financial statements presented are materially correct nor do they provide a conclusion like they would for a review.

We encourage all our clients to inform us of the purpose of the compilation, review, or audit engagement services they are requesting so we can assist in determining what level of service is appropriate for their needs.  The time required to perform the engagement increases as you move from compilation to review to an audit.

Fundamental tax truths for C corporations

The flat 21% federal income tax rate for C corporations under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has been great news for these entities and their owners. But some fundamental tax truths for C corporations largely remain the same:

C corporations are subject to double taxation. Double taxation occurs when corporate income is taxed once at the corporate level and again at the shareholder level as dividends are paid out. The cost of double taxation, however, is now generally less because of the 21% corporate rate.

And double taxation isn’t a problem when a C corporation needs to retain all its earnings to finance growth and capital investments. Because all the earnings stay “inside” the corporation, no dividends are paid to shareholders, and, therefore, there’s no double taxation.

Double taxation also isn’t an issue when a C corporation’s taxable income levels are low. This can often be achieved by paying reasonable salaries and bonuses to shareholder-employees and providing them with tax-favored fringe benefits (deductible by the corporation and tax-free to the recipient shareholder-employees).

C corporation status isn’t generally advisable for ventures with appreciating assets or certain depreciable assets. If assets such as real estate are eventually sold for substantial gains, it may be impossible to extract the profits from the corporation without being subject to double taxation. In contrast, if appreciating assets are held by a pass-through entity (such as an S corporation, partnership or limited liability company treated as a partnership for tax purposes), gains on such sales will be taxed only once, at the owner level.

But assets held by a C corporation don’t necessarily have to appreciate in value for double taxation to occur. Depreciation lowers the tax basis of the property, so a taxable gain results whenever the sale price exceeds the depreciated basis. In effect, appreciation can be caused by depreciation when depreciable assets hold their value.

To avoid this double-taxation issue, you might consider using a pass-through entity to lease to your C corporation appreciating assets or depreciable assets that will hold their value.

C corporation status isn’t generally advisable for ventures that will incur ongoing tax losses. When a venture is set up as a C corporation, losses aren’t passed through to the owners (the shareholders) like they would be in a pass-through entity. Instead, they create corporate net operating losses (NOLs) that can be carried over to future tax years and then used to offset any corporate taxable income.

This was already a potential downside of C corporations, because it can take many years for a start-up to be profitable. Now, under the TCJA, NOLs that arise in tax years beginning after 2017 can’t offset more than 80% of taxable income in the NOL carryover year. So it may take even longer to fully absorb tax losses.

Do you have questions about C corporation tax issues post-TCJA? Contact us.

© 2019