ASU 2016-14: Information about Liquidity

by Colleen Trombetta

Audit Senior at Atchley & Associates, LLP

 

Do you ever find yourself reading a set of financials statements and asking, “So how are we doing cash-wise?” or “Do we have enough cash to pay all our expenses this month… how about the next six months?” It’s clear that the readers of financial statements are concerned with cash. The FASB Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-14, Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958): Presentation of Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Entities, is going to address this concern of cash and take it one step further by addressing liquidity, which is more complex than just cash-on-hand.

The financial assets that an organization has available to cover operating expenses consist not only of cash, but also of assets that will turn into cash within the coming year, such as accounts receivable, contributions and grants receivable and short-term investments. On the balance sheet, these assets are presented as “Current Assets.” If there are no donor restrictions or board designations, the current assets would be disclosed in the financial statements notes as assets available to cover operating expenses within one year of the balance sheet date.

ASU 2016-14 will require disclosure of the organization’s policies for managing liquidity. The policies should cover areas such as cash reserves, available lines of credit, and investment of cash in excess of current operating needs.

ASU 2016-14 will also require nonprofits to present, on the face of the financial position, the amount for each of two classes of net assets— net assets with donor restrictions and net assets without donor restrictions— as opposed to three.

ASU 2016-14 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, with early application permitted.

 

 

References.

https://www.aicpa.org/interestareas/centerforplainenglishaccounting/resources/2016/asu-2016-14.html

https://www.nonprofitaccountingacademy.com/asu-2016-14-nonprofit-liquidity/

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