Author: atchleycpasblog

Small businesses: Get ready for your 1099-MISC reporting requirements

A month after the new year begins, your business may be required to comply with rules to report amounts paid to independent contractors, vendors and others. You may have to send 1099-MISC forms to those whom you pay nonemployee compensation, as well as file copies with the IRS. This task can be time consuming and there are penalties for not complying, so it’s a good idea to begin gathering information early to help ensure smooth filing.

Deadline

There are many types of 1099 forms. For example, 1099-INT is sent out to report interest income and 1099-B is used to report broker transactions and barter exchanges. Employers must provide a Form 1099-MISC for nonemployee compensation by January 31, 2020, to each noncorporate service provider who was paid at least $600 for services during 2019. (1099-MISC forms generally don’t have to be provided to corporate service providers, although there are exceptions.)

A copy of each Form 1099-MISC with payments listed in box 7 must also be filed with the IRS by January 31. “Copy A” is filed with the IRS and “Copy B” is sent to each recipient.

There are no longer any extensions for filing Form 1099-MISC late and there are penalties for late filers. The returns will be considered timely filed if postmarked on or before the due date.

A few years ago, the deadlines for some of these forms were later. But the earlier January 31 deadline for 1099-MISC was put in place to give the IRS more time to spot errors on tax returns. In addition, it makes it easier for the IRS to verify the legitimacy of returns and properly issue refunds to taxpayers who are eligible to receive them.

Gathering information

Hopefully, you’ve collected W-9 forms from independent contractors to whom you paid $600 or more this year. The information on W-9s can be used to help compile the information you need to send 1099-MISC forms to recipients and file them with the IRS. Here’s a link to the Form W-9 if you need to request contractors and vendors to fill it out: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw9.pdf

Form changes coming next year

In addition to payments to independent contractors and vendors, 1099-MISC forms are used to report other types of payments. As described above, Form 1099-MISC is filed to report nonemployment compensation (NEC) in box 7. There may be separate deadlines that report compensation in other boxes on the form. In other words, you may have to file some 1099-MISC forms earlier than others. But in 2020, the IRS will be requiring “Form 1099-NEC” to end confusion and complications for taxpayers. This new form will be used to report 2020 nonemployee compensation by February 1, 2021.

Help with compliance

But for nonemployee compensation for 2019, your business will still use Form 1099-MISC. If you have questions about your reporting requirements, contact us.

© 2019

Budgeting is key to a successful start-up

More than half of recent college graduates plan to start a business someday, according to the results of a survey published in August by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Unfortunately, the AICPA estimates that only half of new businesses survive the five-year mark, and only about one in three reach the 10-year mark.

What can you do to improve your start-up’s odds of success? Comprehensive, realistic budgets can help entrepreneurs navigate the challenges that lie ahead.

3 financial statements

Many businesses base their budgets on the prior year’s financial results. But start-ups lack historical financial statements, which can make budgeting difficult.

In your first year of operation, it’s helpful to create an annual budget that forecasts all three financial statements on a monthly basis:

1. The income statement. Start your annual budget by estimating how much you expect to sell each month. Then estimate direct costs (such as materials, labor, sales tax and shipping) based on that sales volume. Many operating costs, such as rent, salaries and insurance, will be fixed over the short run.

Once you spread overhead costs over your sales, it’s unlikely that you’ll report a net profit in your first year of operation. Profitability takes time and hard work! Once you turn a profit, however, remember to save room in your budget for income taxes.

2. The balance sheet. To start generating revenue, you’ll also need equipment and marketing materials (including a website). Other operating assets (like accounts receivable and inventory) typically move in tandem with revenue. How will you finance these assets? Entrepreneurs may invest personal funds, receive money from other investors or take out loans. These items fall under liabilities and equity on the balance sheet.

3. The statement of cash flows. This report tracks sources and uses of cash from operating, investing and financing activities. Essentially, it shows how your business will make ends meet each month. In addition to acquiring assets, start-ups need cash to cover fixed expenses each month.

By forecasting these statements on a monthly basis, you can identify when cash shortfalls, as well as seasonal peaks and troughs, are likely to occur.

Reality check

Budgeting isn’t a static process. Each month, entrepreneurs must compare actual results to the budget — and then adjust the budget based on what they’ve learned. For instance, you may have underbudgeted or overbudgeted on some items and, thus, spent more or less than you anticipated.

Some variances may be the result of macroeconomic forces. For example, increased government regulation, new competition or an economic downturn can adversely affect your budget. Although these items may be outside of an entrepreneur’s control, it’s important to identify them early and develop a contingency plan before variances spiral out of control.

Outside input

An accounting professional can help your start-up put together a realistic budget based on industry benchmarks and demand for your products and services in the marketplace. A CPA-prepared budget can serve as more than just a management tool — it also can be presented to lenders and investors who want to know more about your start-up’s operations and its expected financial results.

© 2019

2019 Q4 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and other employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the fourth quarter of 2019. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

October 15

  • If a calendar-year C corporation that filed an automatic six-month extension:
    • File a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due.
    • Make contributions for 2018 to certain employer-sponsored retirement plans.

October 31

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for third quarter 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. (See exception below under “November 12.”)

November 12

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for third quarter 2019 (Form 941), if you deposited on time (and in full) all of the associated taxes due.

December 16

  • If a calendar-year C corporation, pay the fourth installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.

© 2019

Employees: The (Often) Forgotten Foundation of Business

Guest blogger – Hilary Corna

 

When we think of the face of a company, we think about founders and CEOs. Although they are the few who receive recognition, all the employees who keep the companies running are the ones who make the difference. These employees are easily forgotten, and that is due to the dehumanizing processes that affect business today.

One of these processes is the “customers come first” model. This industrial age–idea remains a major problem in businesses today. To continue improving the quality of business and creating an incentive for employees to invest themselves in the company, high-level executives need to adopt an “employees come first” mindset. 

External success for a business starts with internal success for its employees, and Betsy Raskin Gullickson, editor of the Best Practices section of Strategic Finance magazine, provides insight on this idea through her 2008 article titled “A Corporate Virus?” Although “bringing the human dimension into business isn’t easy,” according to Gullickson, she qualifies that investment in the people who run the business will pay off in the long run (14). She states that “the problem is institutional, but the solution is personal,” which is exactly what the Human Processes Continuum hopes to do for businesses: find a contemporary solution for industrial age–problems. 

Today, we live in a different business environment than that of the industrial era, one that is continuing to evolve, and old world management principles are no longer working. John Marshall, Senior Partner and Global Director of Strategy at Lippincott, and Graham Ritchie, EVP and Chief Strategy Officer at Hill Holiday, co-authored a piece titled “Welcome to the Humans Era” that discusses how brands need to initiate change to appeal not only to the customers, but to the employees as well. 

Now more than ever, customers want to invest in the companies they purchase products from, and this is why we see so many startups sharing their brand mission and story with the world. If customers see that companies support a cause or that its employees are proud to associate themselves with that company, they are more likely to pay attention to that business.

Another contributor to putting employees first is being proactive by starting with a long-term mindset. Essentially, humanizing your business is being proactive. As the business world leaps from the information age to the human age, the way a company will stand out is by displaying that it cares about its employees and customers. 

Pointed short-term goals and victories will culminate into long-term benefits that will create an effective and healthy culture. This all starts from the inside of a business⁠—with its employees⁠—and the reason companies need to reflect on whether they utilize humanizing processes is to keep up with the times and not fall behind

We are in the midst of the next great evolutionary leap in business, from process-centric to human-centric, and HPC’s primary goal is to prioritize humans at the center of business processes. Companies can use HPC tools to find which parts of their businesses aren’t as “human” as they should be and develop a solution that is suitable for them rather than seeking out the next silver bullet. As HPC stimulates humanizing business, each company will develop its own unique approach to identifying and finding solutions for its own set of problems.

Everybody enjoys the feeling of being remembered, cherished, and appreciated, and that includes employees. To build a company from the inside out, ensuring that all employees feel like they are valued and that their perspectives are acknowledged makes a notable difference in their quality of life and, consequently, the quality of the business they represent. 

Feedback is very important to me, and I’d appreciate hearing your thoughts and insight. What do you think companies can do to recognize their employees more? What effects do you think humanizing business will have for employees?

Please connect with me on my social accounts @HilaryCorna, contact me on my website, and follow me on LinkedIn (even if we’re already connected). Thank you!

Should you elect S corporation status?

Operating a business as an S corporation may provide many advantages, including limited liability for owners and no double taxation (at least at the federal level). Self-employed people may also be able to lower their exposure to Social Security and Medicare taxes if they structure their businesses as S corps for federal tax purposes. But not all businesses are eligible — and with changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, S corps may not be as appealing as they once were.

Compare and contrast

The main reason why businesses elect S corp status is to obtain the limited liability of a corporation and the ability to pass corporate income, losses, deductions and credits through to shareholders. In other words, S corps generally avoid double taxation of corporate income — once at the corporate level and again when it’s distributed to shareholders. Instead, tax items pass through to the shareholders’ personal returns, and they pay tax at their individual income tax rates.

But double taxation may be less of a concern today due to the 21% flat income tax rate that now applies to C corporations. Meanwhile, the top individual income tax rate is 37%. S corp owners may be able to take advantage of the qualified business income (QBI) deduction, which can be equal to as much as 20% of QBI.

In order to assess S corp status, you have to run the numbers with your tax advisor, and factor in state taxes to determine which structure will be the most beneficial for you and your business.

S corp qualifications

If you decide to go the S corp route, make sure you qualify and will stay qualified. To be eligible to elect to be an S corp or to convert, your business must:

  • Be a domestic corporation,
  • Have only one class of stock,
  • Have no more than 100 shareholders, and
  • Have only “allowable” shareholders, including individuals, certain trusts and estates. Shareholders can’t include partnerships, corporations and nonresident alien shareholders.

In addition, certain businesses are ineligible, such as financial institutions and insurance companies.

Base compensation on what’s reasonable

Another important consideration when electing S status is shareholder compensation. One strategy for paying less in Social Security and Medicare employment taxes is to pay modest salaries to yourself and any other S corp shareholder-employees. Then, pay out the remaining corporate cash flow (after you’ve retained enough in the company’s accounts to sustain normal business operations) as federal-employment-tax-free cash distributions.

However, the IRS is on the lookout for S corps that pay shareholder-employees unreasonably low salaries to avoid paying employment taxes and then make distributions that aren’t subject to those taxes.

Paying yourself a modest salary will work if you can prove that your salary is reasonable based on market levels for similar jobs. Otherwise, you run the risk of the IRS auditing your business and imposing back employment taxes, interest and penalties. We can help you decide on a salary and gather proof that it’s reasonable.

Consider all angles

Contact us if you think being an S corporation might help reduce your tax bill while still providing liability protection. We can help with the mechanics of making an election or making a conversion, under applicable state law, and then handling the post-conversion tax issues.

© 2019

From the Information Age to the Human Age: Business is Evolving

Our guest blogger today is Hilary Corna, Founder of the Human Processes Continuum with the mission of humanizing business. Hilary is the former Kaizen Senior Executive Office for Toyota Motor Asia Pacific in Singapore where she served as the first female Toyota had ever hired in Asia-Pac Operations managing kaizen operations. Hilary is also a Bestselling Author and worldwide speaker. 

Over the past decade, we’ve built systems that are dehumanizing. Business leaders and companies learned processes from the industrial age, attempted to convert them to the information age, and, in turn, became disconnected from the people who built and continue to build the business.

How many times have you been told, “the system won’t let me do that” in airports, over the phone, or in another situation? We overprocess so many aspects of our lives that people feel detached from the very systems they are responsible for running.

This is a problem we face in the Human Era… but there are ways to overcome it.

I believe we are in the midst of the next great evolutionary leap in business. The next great evolutionary leap is from the information to the human age. This leap requires leaders to upgrade their thinking—their minds. Technology isn’t the leap. Technology is the catalyst for the leap. The leap is humanization.

The Human Processes Continuum (HPC) creates human-centric processes to show companies how to keep their people for life. This is accomplished by leading from the inside-out with an experience mindset. First, discovering what gaps existing in the employee’s experience; second, analyzing what customers are lacking; and third, how society experiences the business.

HPC reflects a blending of empathy and contemporary business practices that produces profound, sustained results. Taking its own advice, the model is designed to be human, and no two companies will find the exact same solution. Each solution is as unique as the business that discovers it.

While HPC utilizes the same tools for all businesses when conducting initial consulting, those tools simply serve to facilitate the process by which each business discovers its solution(s) to become more of the business it was meant to be.

Let’s get one thing straight: HPC is not the end-all be-all for identifying and applying business solutions. These human processes cannot be cut and pasted. And technology, whether it be AI, Machine Learning, Chatbots, the next best CRM software, are all just tools to support the process. Every process is still a human experience.

HPC’s primary focus⁠—transitioning to human-centric processes within business⁠—becomes increasingly relevant every day, and companies like Shake Shack, USAA, and Starbucks showcase the benefits of humanizing business by putting their employees first and intentionally implementing long-term strategies and decisions.

The old style of management principles no longer works, and business leaders are losing A-player talent to competitors every day. We have created the most productive workforce in the world that is the least engaged. To evolve in this Human Era, companies must adapt their processes to have a human perspective.

About the Author:

Headshot Hilary SM

As seen on NBC, ForbesWoman, Upworthy and The New York Times, Hilary Corna is the Founder of the Human Processes Continuum with the mission of humanizing business. She is the former Kaizen Senior Executive Office for Toyota Motor Asia Pacific in Singapore where she served as the first female Toyota had ever hired in Asia-Pac Operations managing kaizen operations. Hilary is a Bestselling Author and her memoir, One White Face, is now being adapted into a screenplay. Hilary has spoken and presented at General Motors, Coca Cola, State Farm, The United Nations, TEDx, and to over 300 colleges worldwide. Hilary serves on the President’s Advisory Council at Elon University, is a Leadership Facilitator for the Coca Cola Scholars Foundation and a Notley Foundation Fellow. Hilary regularly volunteers for the Texas Blood Bank, The Prison Entrepreneurship Program, and Vipassana Meditation Research Institute. Hilary studied at Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan, and at Elon University in North Carolina. She speaks conversational Japanese, resides in Austin, Texas and is represented by Talent Bureau. Get to know her better at www.HilaryCorna.com. Follow her on social at @HilaryCorna and watch a clip from her recent talk here.

Let’s find a better way to manage your receivables

Failure to collect accounts receivable (AR) in a timely manner can lead to myriad financial problems for your company, including poor cash flow and the inability to pay its own bills. Here are five effective ideas to facilitate more timely collections:

1. Create an AR aging report. This report lets you see at a glance the current payment status of all your customers and how much money they owe. Aging reports typically track the payment status of customers by time periods, such as 0–30 days, 31–60 days, 61–90 days and 91+ days past due.

Armed with this information, you’ll have a better idea of where to focus your efforts. For example, you can concentrate on collecting the largest receivables that are the furthest past due. Or you can zero in on collecting receivables that are between 31 and 60 days outstanding before they become any further behind.

2. Assign collection responsibility to a sole accounting employee. Giving one employee the responsibility for AR collections ensures that the “collection buck” stops with someone. Otherwise, the task of collections could fall by the wayside as accounting employees pick up on other tasks that might seem more urgent.

3. Re-examine your invoices. Your customers prefer bills that are clear, accurate and easy to understand. Sending out invoices that are sloppy, vague or inaccurate will slow down the payment process as customers try to contact you for clarification. Essentially you’re inviting your customers to not pay your invoices promptly.

4. Offer customers multiple ways to pay. The more payment options customers have, the easier it is for them to pay your invoices promptly. These include payment by check, Automated Clearing House, credit or debit card, PayPal or even text message.

5. Be proactive in your billing and collection efforts. Many of your customers may have specific procedures that must be followed by vendors for invoice formatting and submission. Learn these procedures and follow them carefully to avoid payment delays. Also, consider contacting customers a couple of days before payment is due (especially for large payments) to make sure everything is on track.

Lax working capital practices can be a costly mistake. Contact us to help implement these and other strategies to improve collections and boost your revenue and cash flow. We can also help you with strategies for dealing with situations where it’s become clear that a past-due customer won’t (or can’t) pay an invoice.

© 2019

M&A transactions: Avoid surprises from the IRS

If you’re considering buying or selling a business — or you’re in the process of a merger or acquisition — it’s important that both parties report the transaction to the IRS in the same way. Otherwise, you may increase your chances of being audited.

If a sale involves business assets (as opposed to stock or ownership interests), the buyer and the seller must generally report to the IRS the purchase price allocations that both use. This is done by attaching IRS Form 8594, “Asset Acquisition Statement,” to each of their respective federal income tax returns for the tax year that includes the transaction.

What’s reported?

When buying business assets in an M&A transaction, you must allocate the total purchase price to the specific assets that are acquired. The amount allocated to each asset then becomes its initial tax basis. For depreciable and amortizable assets, the initial tax basis of each asset determines the depreciation and amortization deductions for that asset after the acquisition. Depreciable and amortizable assets include:

  • Equipment,
  • Buildings and improvements,
  • Software,
  • Furniture, fixtures and
  • Intangibles (including customer lists, licenses, patents, copyrights and goodwill).

In addition to reporting the items above, you must also disclose on Form 8594 whether the parties entered into a noncompete agreement, management contract or similar agreement, as well as the monetary consideration paid under it.

IRS scrutiny

The IRS may inspect the forms that are filed to see if the buyer and the seller use different allocations. If the IRS finds that different allocations are used, auditors may dig deeper and the investigation could expand beyond just the transaction. So, it’s in your best interest to ensure that both parties use the same allocations. Consider including this requirement in your asset purchase agreement at the time of the sale.

The tax implications of buying or selling a business are complicated. Price allocations are important because they affect future tax benefits. Both the buyer and the seller need to report them to the IRS in an identical way to avoid unwanted attention. To lock in the best postacquisition results, consult with us before finalizing any transaction.

© 2019

 

2019 Q3 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and other employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the third quarter of 2019. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

July 31

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the second quarter of 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. (See the exception below, under “August 12.”)
  • File a 2018 calendar-year retirement plan report (Form 5500 or Form 5500-EZ) or request an extension.

August 12

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for the second quarter of 2019 (Form 941), if you deposited on time and in full all of the associated taxes due.

September 16

  • If a calendar-year C corporation, pay the third installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.
  • If a calendar-year S corporation or partnership that filed an automatic six-month extension:
    • File a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120S, Form 1065 or Form 1065-B) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due.
    • Make contributions for 2018 to certain employer-sponsored retirement plans.

© 2019

Hiring this summer? You may qualify for a valuable tax credit

Is your business hiring this summer? If the employees come from certain “targeted groups,” you may be eligible for the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This includes youth whom you bring in this summer for two or three months. The maximum credit employers can claim is $2,400 to $9,600 for each eligible employee.

10 targeted groups

An employer is generally eligible for the credit only for qualified wages paid to members of 10 targeted groups:

  • Qualified members of families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program,
  • Qualified veterans,
  • Designated community residents who live in Empowerment Zones or rural renewal counties,
  • Qualified ex-felons,
  • Vocational rehabilitation referrals,
  • Qualified summer youth employees,
  • Qualified members of families in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program,
  • Qualified Supplemental Security Income recipients,
  • Long-term family assistance recipients, and
  • Qualified individuals who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer.

For each employee, there’s also a minimum requirement that the employee have completed at least 120 hours of service for the employer, and that employment begin before January 1, 2020.

Also, the credit isn’t available for certain employees who are related to the employer or work more than 50% of the time outside of a trade or business of the employer (for example, working as a house cleaner in the employer’s home). And it generally isn’t available for employees who have previously worked for the employer.

Calculate the savings

For employees other than summer youth employees, the credit amount is calculated under the following rules. The employer can take into account up to $6,000 of first-year wages per employee ($10,000 for “long-term family assistance recipients” and/or $12,000, $14,000 or $24,000 for certain veterans). If the employee completed at least 120 hours but less than 400 hours of service for the employer, the wages taken into account are multiplied by 25%. If the employee completed 400 or more hours, all of the wages taken into account are multiplied by 40%.

Therefore, the maximum credit available for the first-year wages is $2,400 ($6,000 × 40%) per employee. It is $4,000 [$10,000 × 40%] for “long-term family assistance recipients”; $4,800, $5,600 or $9,600 [$12,000, $14,000 or $24,000 × 40%] for certain veterans. In order to claim a $9,600 credit, a veteran must be certified as being entitled to compensation for a service-connected disability and be unemployed for at least six months during the one-year period ending on the hiring date.

Additionally, for “long-term family assistance recipients,” there’s a 50% credit for up to $10,000 of second-year wages, resulting in a total maximum credit, over two years, of $9,000 [$10,000 × 40% plus $10,000 × 50%].

The “first year” described above is the year-long period which begins with the employee’s first day of work. The “second year” is the year that immediately follows.

For summer youth employees, the rules described above apply, except that you can only take into account up to $3,000 of wages, and the wages must be paid for services performed during any 90-day period between May 1 and September 15. That means that, for summer youth employees, the maximum credit available is $1,200 ($3,000 × 40%) per employee. Summer youth employees are defined as those who are at least 16 years old, but under 18 on the hiring date or May 1 (whichever is later), and reside in an Empowerment Zone, enterprise community or renewal community.

We can help

The WOTC can offset the cost of hiring qualified new employees. There are some additional rules that, in limited circumstances, prohibit the credit or require an allocation of the credit. And you must fill out and submit paperwork to the government. Contact us for assistance or more information about your situation.

© 2019