investment

Defer tax with a Section 1031 exchange, but new limits apply this year

Normally when appreciated business assets such as real estate are sold, tax is owed on the appreciation. But there’s a way to defer this tax: a Section 1031 “like kind” exchange. However, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) reduces the types of property eligible for this favorable tax treatment.

What is a like-kind exchange?

Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code allows you to defer gains on real or personal property used in a business or held for investment if, instead of selling it, you exchange it solely for property of a “like kind.” Thus, the tax benefit of an exchange is that you defer tax and, thereby, have use of the tax savings until you sell the replacement property.

This technique is especially flexible for real estate, because virtually any type of real estate will be considered to be of a like kind, as long as it’s business or investment property. For example, you can exchange a warehouse for an office building, or an apartment complex for a strip mall.

Deferred and reverse exchanges

Although a like-kind exchange may sound quick and easy, it’s relatively rare for two owners to simply swap properties. You’ll likely have to execute a “deferred” exchange, in which you engage a qualified intermediary (QI) for assistance.

When you sell your property (the relinquished property), the net proceeds go directly to the QI, who then uses them to buy replacement property. To qualify for tax-deferred exchange treatment, you generally must identify replacement property within 45 days after you transfer the relinquished property and complete the purchase within 180 days after the initial transfer.

An alternate approach is a “reverse” exchange. Here, an exchange accommodation titleholder (EAT) acquires title to the replacement property before you sell the relinquished property. You can defer capital gains by identifying one or more properties to exchange within 45 days after the EAT receives the replacement property and, typically, completing the transaction within 180 days.

Changes under the TCJA

There had been some concern that tax reform would include the elimination of like-kind exchanges. The good news is that the TCJA still generally allows tax-deferred like-kind exchanges of business and investment real estate.

But there’s also some bad news: For 2018 and beyond, the TCJA eliminates tax-deferred like-kind exchange treatment for exchanges of personal property. However, prior-law rules that allow like-kind exchanges of personal property still apply if one leg of an exchange was completed by December 31, 2017, but one leg remained open on that date. Keep in mind that exchanged personal property must be of the same asset or product class.

Complex rules

The rules for like-kind exchanges are complex, so these arrangements present some risks. If, say, you exchange the wrong kind of property or acquire cash or other non-like-kind property in a deal, you may still end up incurring a sizable tax hit. If you’re exploring a like-kind exchange, contact us. We can help you ensure you’re in compliance with the rules.

© 2018

A Simple Technique for Reducing Future Taxes

by Joe Ben Combs, CPA

Tax Manager at Atchley & Associates, LLP

 

If you’ve ever done any sort of investment planning you’re probably familiar with the concept of tax loss harvesting. This is the practice of selling an investment that has decreased in value and purchasing a comparable investment, triggering capital losses which can be deducted against your other income. (There are a number of associated tax and non-tax issues that we will not address in this article so please consult a financial advisor or tax professional. before executing on this strategy.)

While tax loss harvesting is a great tax-saving move for a lot of people, the exact opposite can be even more beneficial for some and is far less often discussed. Tax gain harvesting is the practice of selling appreciated securities and immediately repurchasing the same or similar securities. Now instead of triggering capital losses you have created potentially taxable gains. So why would you do this?

Long term capital gains (gains on the sale of capital assets held for more than a year) are taxed at reduced rates. For people in most tax brackets this means a rate of 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax brackets, qualified dividends and long term capital gains are taxed at 0%!

That’s no tax.

So how does this help you? Why is this beneficial when I could just as easily avoid tax by not selling anything? The benefit is not in the selling but in the repurchasing. By purchasing the same assets at a higher price you are now holding the same investment as before but you have increased your cost basis, thereby reducing future gains. All without any current tax cost. While it won’t save you any tax dollars today, your future self will thank you!

So now that we’ve covered the fun part – there are a few things to watch out for.

  1. First and foremost, the preferential rates only apply to assets held for more than one year. If you are selling shares of a security that you have purchased at various dates, make sure to select lots with the requisite holding period.
  2. While the wash sale rule that applies to loss harvesting (aimed at discouraging the repurchase of a security within 30 days of sale) does not apply to gain harvesting, some mutual funds will not allow an investor who has sold out of the fund to buy back in before a certain time period has passed. You will want to review any potential reinvestment restrictions applicable to the assets you intend to sell so that you can plan accordingly.
  3. Beware of state income taxes. Depending on where you live that 0% rate may not apply and state income taxes may cut into the benefit of the increase in basis. If you’re here in Texas that won’t be an issue but if you live in a state that taxes capital gains it may be something to consider.
  4. While a capital gain itself may avoid taxation, it still increases your adjusted gross income (AGI), which can affect the calculation of a number of credits and deductions. On top of this the additional income may increase the amount of Social Security benefits subject to tax.
  5. If you already have realized losses for the year it may defeat the purpose of harvesting gains, depending on the situation. This is certainly something to discuss with an advisor.

There are a number of other planning considerations that we don’t have time to discuss here but needless to say, we highly recommend discussing this or any other tax planning strategy with a qualified advisor.