Payroll

Accounting Services: Should I consider this service for my business?

by Liana Ellison, CPA

Accounting Services Manager at Atchley & Associates, LLP

 

Atchley & Associates, LLP provides accounting services of various levels to many of our clients. The levels of services vary from consulting with startup companies about their accounting set up all the way to outsourcing their accounting department to us. We are able to provide a custom level of service to meet our client’s needs. Some of the accounting services we provide at Atchley & Associates include:

  • Outsourced payroll, set up, reporting, support and consulting
  • Outsourced bookkeeping, reconciliations of accounts such as bank, credit cards, loans and lines of credit, and preparation of any adjusting journal entries
  • Review of systems utilized and internal processes, and make recommendations of accounting platforms and ancillary applications
  • Customized Financial Statement preparation
  • Preparation or support for various compliance such as personal property renditions, Forms 1099, and Sales Tax
  • Year-end accounting analysis and clean-up in preparation for tax return

In addition, our team can take the pressure off business owners or executive directors that may not have the expertise or time to review and supervise the work performed by their accounting department.  These leaders may not want to deal with having to worry about turnover or fraud in this critical position, and often engage us to support them in this area of their business or organization.

Our services are not specific to any one industry, therefore we are able to support various types of service industries including a number of non-profit clients.

I’ve put together some recent questions that our group has received and compiled them into a True or False Quiz as examples of how we support our client. As in every case, that correct answer is- “it depends”. However, you may find some helpful information for your business or line of work.

  1. A client inquired, I receive a cell phone allowance with my payroll of $50 a month, this taxable compensation to me- true or false?

False- this can be considered non-taxable compensation, as a non-tax fringe benefit IF

– The employer has an accountable plan and

– There is a business connection for the cell phone use and

– The allowance does not exceed the cost of employee’s monthly plan (requires substantiation). Any excess allowance would be considered taxable compensation.

  i. IRS Notice 2011-72

  1. I had the privilege to attend the Rotary scholarship luncheon last month with our partner, Harold Ingersoll, where Rotarians gave out over $43K in scholarships towards recipient’s tuition and higher learning. The Rotary Club of Austin is not required to issue a 1099 to these recipients for the amount received- true or false?

True- the Rotary Club of Austin is not required to issue scholarship recipients a 1099 since these funds were not in connection with any services performed for teaching, research or other services as a condition for receiving the scholarship. It may not prevent the recipient from picking it up as income on their personal return, but nothing is required to be reported to the IRS by the Rotary Club of Austin.

  i. Sec 117(b) and Regulations section 1.6041-3(n), Tax Topic 421

  1. I have an hourly (non-exempt) employee therefore I am only required to pay them at least once a month in the state of Texas- True or False?

False- per Texas Pay Day Law hourly (non-exempt) employees must be paid at least twice a month.

  i. Texas Payday Law section 61.011

  1. I bought a used iPad mini for my business for $199. Since the cost is less than $250, I don’t need to report this property on the Personal Property Rendition for Travis County– true or false?

False- per Travis County Appraisal District, ALL business personal property that is used in business must be rendered on the form, regardless of the amount.

  1. I just started a new business and have chosen QuickBooks Online as the application to provide record keeping for my business because I have heard it’s the best in the market- True or False?

Trick question- You might receive a different answer depending on who you ask. There are several new applications on the market that compare to QuickBooks Online. However, QuickBooks still retains a large portion of the small business market.

  i. Contact us to find out what might be the right fit for your business.

You can leverage our services for more answers to these types of questions in addition to receiving accurate reporting and record keeping.  Contact us for more information on how we can help your business.

 

Fraud Awareness and the Small Business 2016

By Frank Stover, CPA/CFF/CGMA, CFE

Audit Manager at Atchley & Associates, LLP

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners has released the biennial Report To The Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse, a 2016 Global Fraud Study.

For small business the fraud that owners will most often see committed against them or their company is “occupational fraud”.  The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners defines occupational fraud “as the use of one’s occupation for personal enrichment through the deliberate misuse or misapplication of the employing organization’s resources or assets.”  Occupational fraud can manifest itself in many ways.  Nor is it limited by gender.

Based upon the statistics and information contained in the “Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse”, 2016 Global Fraud Study, approximately two thirds of the reported cases targeted privately and publicly held companies.  Private companies suffered median losses of $180,000. The median losses suffered by small organizations (those with less than 100 employees) was the same as those of the largest organizations, but the impact upon smaller organizations would be much greater.  The total losses caused by the cases studied exceeded $6.3 billion. It is estimated that fraud costs organizations 5% of revenues each year, applying this percentage to the Gross World Product of $74.16 trillion results in a potential total fraud loss worldwide of $3.7 trillion.  Constant vigilance to prevent fraudulent activity is something that small business owners must practice every day.

Generally, occupational fraud categorized as financial statement fraud, misappropriation of assets, or corruption.  Asset misappropriation was the most common form of fraud reported in more than 83% of the cases studied.  Financial statement fraud will typically involve falsification of an organization’s financial statements or some form of regulatory or financial report. Examples include overstating assets and revenues, or understating liabilities or expenses to achieve personal gain.  Misappropriation of assets is the theft or misuse of an organization’s assets, such as skimming revenues, stealing inventory or committing payroll fraud.  Corruption involves fraudsters wrongfully use their influence in a business transaction to procure some benefit for themselves or another person(s), contradicting their duty to their employer or the rights of another, for instance by accepting kickbacks or engaging in conflicts of interest.

94.5% of the cases studied involved the perpetrator making efforts to conceal their fraud by creating or altering physical documentation.

For Small businesses cash, inventory, payroll and misuse of organization assets are the most common areas of fraud occurrence.  Cash is the most often pilfered from small business but because of its nature and importance to small businesses it is usually discovered within one month.  Inventory fraud is usually not discovered until later because small organizations will be more focused on operation measures (for example, revenues run rates, billing cycle  and accounts receivable information) in the short term and inventory will not be counted or reconciled against purchases and jobs in progress until quarter or year end.  Payroll fraud is usually committed by persons who have some form of operational control and authorization such that they can add phantom employees to the payroll or in collusion with others falsified time records submitted to the payroll department, this type of fraud is most usually discovered when there is turnover in personnel, a “falling out” between conspirators, or some form of periodic management review and reconciliation of historical project costs against approved budgets.  Misuse of organization assets many times occurs when a service company employee uses their employer’s assets on the weekend and holidays to run another business on the side, discovery of this type of fraud will usually occur when a disgruntled customer of the employee’s side business complains regarding defective work or makes a warranty claim, control of physical access to company operating assets during no business hours and mileage logs reconciliations are several ways to prevent or detect such abuse.

The most common detection methods in the cases studied were tips (39.1%).  Organizations that had reporting hotlines were much more likely to detect fraud through tips.

There are fraud policies and controls which can assist small businesses in deterring bad behavior.  Some of these include having a clearly written and communicated fraud policy which describes how and who handles fraud matters and investigations within the organization, what actions the organization considers to constitute fraud, reporting procedures (anonymous tip lines, a designated official, etc.), and what consequences the organization will take for such activity and the dedication to follow through with those stated consequences.

Atchley & Associates, LLP is a group of dedicated professionals, which include Certified Fraud Examiners, who can review, assess and make recommendations regarding small business systems of internal controls to decrease the likelihood of fraud being committed.

Payroll Service Providers (PSP)

The Spring SSA/IRS Reporter includes a useful article offering tips for organizations that use payroll service providers. A payroll service provider (PSP) can be an excellent option for employers that are looking for assistance with payroll processing and payroll tax deposit requirements. However, it is important to remember that the responsibility for timely filing and payment still lies with the employer. The IRS can hold you and your business ultimately responsible for unpaid taxes, or unfiled or late files returns. The IRS offers a few tips if you use a payroll service:

  1. Check to see if your payroll service is listed on the IRS Payroll Service Providers page. The listed providers have passed IRS testing requirements [Click here to see the full list].
  2. Know your tax due dates. The IRS offers Tax Calendar options that can help [Tax Calendar].
  3. Review your payroll tax reports for accuracy before they are filed.
  4. Enroll in EFTPS. You will be able to login and see the tax payments made under your EIN, and make missed payments, if necessary.
  5. Keep your organization’s address as the address of record with the IRS. This way you are sure to see any correspondence from the IRS and make sure that a response is made quickly.
  6. If you suspect your PSP is not complying with regulations, file a complaint with the IRS using Form 14157.

As always, Atchley & Associates, LLP is happy to answer questions or assist you in any way we can.

Reference. Publication 1693 (Rev. 6-2015) Catalog Number 15060W Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service www.irs.gov